Event Title

The Human Library

Presenter

LMU Community

Event Type

Event

Location

Jazzman's Cafe Patio of Hannon Library

Start Date

8-11-2012 12:00 PM

End Date

8-11-2012 4:00 PM

Description

The Human Library event was an innovative program designed to promote dialogue, reduce prejudices and encourage understanding between human beings. The Human Library works exactly like a normal library-readers come and borrow a Book for a limited period of time. After "reading" it, they returned the Book to the library, and - if they want - they can borrow another Book. However, the one significant difference is that the Books in the Human Library are human beings, and each Book will share their unique story with a Reader, allowing for personal dialogue. "Human Books" are checked out by Readers for a 30 minute conversation in a private yet structured environment. The so-called "Human Books" are people representing groups frequently confronted with prejudices and stereotypes, and who may be victims of discrimination or social exclusion. The Reader can be anybody who is interested in hearing a unique story, is ready to civilly talk with his or her own prejudice and stereotype, and is willing to spend half an hour of time engaging in this experience.

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Nov 8th, 12:00 PM Nov 8th, 4:00 PM

The Human Library

Jazzman's Cafe Patio of Hannon Library

The Human Library event was an innovative program designed to promote dialogue, reduce prejudices and encourage understanding between human beings. The Human Library works exactly like a normal library-readers come and borrow a Book for a limited period of time. After "reading" it, they returned the Book to the library, and - if they want - they can borrow another Book. However, the one significant difference is that the Books in the Human Library are human beings, and each Book will share their unique story with a Reader, allowing for personal dialogue. "Human Books" are checked out by Readers for a 30 minute conversation in a private yet structured environment. The so-called "Human Books" are people representing groups frequently confronted with prejudices and stereotypes, and who may be victims of discrimination or social exclusion. The Reader can be anybody who is interested in hearing a unique story, is ready to civilly talk with his or her own prejudice and stereotype, and is willing to spend half an hour of time engaging in this experience.