Event Title

Restoring Justice and Community Engagement

Presenter

Lee Baca

Event Type

Talk

Location

University Hall 1000

Start Date

23-10-2013 10:00 AM

End Date

23-10-2013 11:50 AM

Description

Moderated by Javier Stauring, Co-Director, Los Angeles Archdiocese Office of Restorative Justice

Lee Baca, Los Angeles County Sheriff

Baca was elected Los Angeles County’s 30th Sheriff against his mentor Sherman Block, who had died in office days prior to the election but remained on the ballot. He was sworn in on December 7, 1998. He was re-elected to a fourth term in 2010. Baca began his career in street patrol, custody, and recruitment and was a staff instructor at the Sheriff’s Academy. In 1981, Baca became captain of the Norwalk, California sheriff station. On January 23, 1992, Sheriff Sherman Block promoted Baca to the rank of Chief Deputy. Sheriff Baca also developed the Office of Independent Review, comprised of six civil rights attorneys who provide independent oversight on all internal affairs and internal criminal investigations concerning alleged misconduct by Department personnel.

Honorable Donna Quigley Groman, Judge for the Superior Court of Los Angeles County

Judge Groman has been a judicial officer since 1997. She is assigned to the L.A. County Juvenile Delinquency Court. Judge Groman was named the California Judges Association Juvenile Court Judge 2012. She serves as faculty to the Center for Judicial Education and Research in CA, teaching juvenile delinquency law and related topics to judges statewide. In addition, Judge Groman is creating systemic change in the juvenile justice system by addressing issues such as: Domestic minor sex trafficking (“STAR” Collaborative Court”), re-entry from probation facilities, reducing the school to prison pipeline through intake revision and implementation of Restorative Justice practices, school-based arrest reform, school discipline as it impacts probation youth, parent engagement, extended foster care and independent living services, permanency planning for probation youth, and child-parent domestic violence.

David Muhammad, CEO, Solutions Inc.

David Muhammad is a leader in the fields of criminal justice, violence prevention, and youth development. David is the CEO of Solutions Inc., a consulting firm providing technical assistance to several California philanthropic foundations on juvenile and criminal justice issues. The former Chief Probation Officer of the Alameda County Probation Department, David was responsible for overseeing 20,000 people on probation, a staff of 600, and a $90 million budget. David ushered in enormous reform in Alameda County to move probation away from a deficit-based correctional model into a strengths-based Positive Youth Development model. David formally served as the Deputy Commissioner of New York City’s Department of Probation, and was responsible for overseeing 35,000 people on probation and a staff of 800. David previously served as the Chief of Committed Services for the Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services. At DYRS, David’s responsibility included 300 staff, a $42 million annual budget, a juvenile institution, and 900 youth committed to his department’s care.

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Oct 23rd, 10:00 AM Oct 23rd, 11:50 AM

Restoring Justice and Community Engagement

University Hall 1000

Moderated by Javier Stauring, Co-Director, Los Angeles Archdiocese Office of Restorative Justice

Lee Baca, Los Angeles County Sheriff

Baca was elected Los Angeles County’s 30th Sheriff against his mentor Sherman Block, who had died in office days prior to the election but remained on the ballot. He was sworn in on December 7, 1998. He was re-elected to a fourth term in 2010. Baca began his career in street patrol, custody, and recruitment and was a staff instructor at the Sheriff’s Academy. In 1981, Baca became captain of the Norwalk, California sheriff station. On January 23, 1992, Sheriff Sherman Block promoted Baca to the rank of Chief Deputy. Sheriff Baca also developed the Office of Independent Review, comprised of six civil rights attorneys who provide independent oversight on all internal affairs and internal criminal investigations concerning alleged misconduct by Department personnel.

Honorable Donna Quigley Groman, Judge for the Superior Court of Los Angeles County

Judge Groman has been a judicial officer since 1997. She is assigned to the L.A. County Juvenile Delinquency Court. Judge Groman was named the California Judges Association Juvenile Court Judge 2012. She serves as faculty to the Center for Judicial Education and Research in CA, teaching juvenile delinquency law and related topics to judges statewide. In addition, Judge Groman is creating systemic change in the juvenile justice system by addressing issues such as: Domestic minor sex trafficking (“STAR” Collaborative Court”), re-entry from probation facilities, reducing the school to prison pipeline through intake revision and implementation of Restorative Justice practices, school-based arrest reform, school discipline as it impacts probation youth, parent engagement, extended foster care and independent living services, permanency planning for probation youth, and child-parent domestic violence.

David Muhammad, CEO, Solutions Inc.

David Muhammad is a leader in the fields of criminal justice, violence prevention, and youth development. David is the CEO of Solutions Inc., a consulting firm providing technical assistance to several California philanthropic foundations on juvenile and criminal justice issues. The former Chief Probation Officer of the Alameda County Probation Department, David was responsible for overseeing 20,000 people on probation, a staff of 600, and a $90 million budget. David ushered in enormous reform in Alameda County to move probation away from a deficit-based correctional model into a strengths-based Positive Youth Development model. David formally served as the Deputy Commissioner of New York City’s Department of Probation, and was responsible for overseeing 35,000 people on probation and a staff of 800. David previously served as the Chief of Committed Services for the Department of Youth Rehabilitation Services. At DYRS, David’s responsibility included 300 staff, a $42 million annual budget, a juvenile institution, and 900 youth committed to his department’s care.