Event Title

The Social Consequences of Mass Incarceration - VIDEO

Event Type

Talk

Location

Hilton 100

Streaming Media

Start Date

21-10-2013 10:15 AM

End Date

21-10-2013 11:30 AM

Description

Marc Mauer has directed programs on criminal justice policy reform for 30 years, and is the author of some of the most widely-cited reports and publications in the field. His 1995 report on racial disparity and the criminal justice system led The New York Times to editorialize that the report “should set off alarm bells from the White House to city halls – and help reverse the notion that we can incarcerate our way out of fundamental social problems.” Race to Incarcerate, Mauer’s ground-breaking book on sentencing policies, was a semifinalist for the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award in 1999. Mauer began his work in criminal justice with the American Friends Service Committee in 1975, and served as the organization’s National Justice Communications Coordinator. In 2005, he became Executive Director of The Sentencing Project. Mauer has received numerous awards, including the Margaret Mead Award from the International Community Corrections Association (2009), and the Inside/ Out Summit Award from Centerforce (2011).

Theme of the day: Why Does Justice Need Restoring

Moderated by Jonathan Rothchild, Associate Professor of Theological Studies

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Oct 21st, 10:15 AM Oct 21st, 11:30 AM

The Social Consequences of Mass Incarceration - VIDEO

Hilton 100

Marc Mauer has directed programs on criminal justice policy reform for 30 years, and is the author of some of the most widely-cited reports and publications in the field. His 1995 report on racial disparity and the criminal justice system led The New York Times to editorialize that the report “should set off alarm bells from the White House to city halls – and help reverse the notion that we can incarcerate our way out of fundamental social problems.” Race to Incarcerate, Mauer’s ground-breaking book on sentencing policies, was a semifinalist for the Robert F. Kennedy Book Award in 1999. Mauer began his work in criminal justice with the American Friends Service Committee in 1975, and served as the organization’s National Justice Communications Coordinator. In 2005, he became Executive Director of The Sentencing Project. Mauer has received numerous awards, including the Margaret Mead Award from the International Community Corrections Association (2009), and the Inside/ Out Summit Award from Centerforce (2011).

Theme of the day: Why Does Justice Need Restoring

Moderated by Jonathan Rothchild, Associate Professor of Theological Studies