Event Title

On the Pragmatics of Slow Attention - VIDEO

Event Type

Talk

Location

University Hall, EEC 1857

Streaming Media

Start Date

7-10-2016 12:40 PM

End Date

7-10-2016 2:10 PM

Description

This talk experimented with the following proposition: that slowness does not privilege one set of beliefs or values over another. Instead, slowness is a mode of learning and paying attention that resists the temptation to make evaluations and judgments on behalf of others. This proposition was framed in terms of Alfred North Whitehead’s rhythms of education and Isabelle Stengers’ work on pragmatics and non-modern practices (e.g. sorcery, witchcraft, and animism). Along the way, I referenced ongoing work that I’m engaged in at the Laboratory for Critical Technics (LCT) at Arizona State University in order to illustrate how speculative and critical design techniques might function as catalysts for slow attention to grow and flourish.

Adam Nocek is an Assistant Professor in the philosophy of technology and science and technology studies in the School of Arts, Media + Engineering at Arizona State University. Nocek works at the intersections of Continental philosophy and science studies, digital culture and aesthetics, and design theory and technoscience, and has published numerous essays on media theory, artificial life, architecture, the history of biotechnology, and process philosophy. He is the co-editor of the collection The Lure of Whitehead (Minnesota 2014), and a special issue of the journal Inflexions titled “animating biophilosophy” (2014). He is currently working on a manuscript titled Animating Capital: Molecules, Labor, and the Cultural Production of Science." Nocek is also the founding director of the Laboratory for Critical Technics (LCT) at Arizona State University.

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Oct 7th, 12:40 PM Oct 7th, 2:10 PM

On the Pragmatics of Slow Attention - VIDEO

University Hall, EEC 1857

This talk experimented with the following proposition: that slowness does not privilege one set of beliefs or values over another. Instead, slowness is a mode of learning and paying attention that resists the temptation to make evaluations and judgments on behalf of others. This proposition was framed in terms of Alfred North Whitehead’s rhythms of education and Isabelle Stengers’ work on pragmatics and non-modern practices (e.g. sorcery, witchcraft, and animism). Along the way, I referenced ongoing work that I’m engaged in at the Laboratory for Critical Technics (LCT) at Arizona State University in order to illustrate how speculative and critical design techniques might function as catalysts for slow attention to grow and flourish.

Adam Nocek is an Assistant Professor in the philosophy of technology and science and technology studies in the School of Arts, Media + Engineering at Arizona State University. Nocek works at the intersections of Continental philosophy and science studies, digital culture and aesthetics, and design theory and technoscience, and has published numerous essays on media theory, artificial life, architecture, the history of biotechnology, and process philosophy. He is the co-editor of the collection The Lure of Whitehead (Minnesota 2014), and a special issue of the journal Inflexions titled “animating biophilosophy” (2014). He is currently working on a manuscript titled Animating Capital: Molecules, Labor, and the Cultural Production of Science." Nocek is also the founding director of the Laboratory for Critical Technics (LCT) at Arizona State University.