Event Website

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1hWVwjQaI20utLQWehoyjItuorQoy6uYhExuKxJ8slaE/edit?usp=sharing

Start Date

11-12-2017 11:05 AM

Description

Increased technological capabilities allow for new and exciting ways to market to potential consumers. As a result, advertising has assumed an ever-increasing presence in the world. Marketers need guidance in navigating this complicated sector, leading to the emergence of a new field: neuromarketing. Neuroscience can reveal key, subconscious and potentially lucrative information about the responses advertisements elicit in viewers. Tools such as electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) can trace physiological responses that indicate levels of receptiveness to the stimuli being presented. This proposed research experiment seeks to present a sample of participants with either visual or auditory advertisements, tracked via EEG or EMG, to essentially determine which mode of advertising is more effective. It also seeks to determine if EEG and EMG indicate similar levels of response.

Comments

Dr. Amy Lauer

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Dec 11th, 11:05 AM

Comparing TV and Radio Advertising: A Focus on Visual Versus Auditory Advertising

Increased technological capabilities allow for new and exciting ways to market to potential consumers. As a result, advertising has assumed an ever-increasing presence in the world. Marketers need guidance in navigating this complicated sector, leading to the emergence of a new field: neuromarketing. Neuroscience can reveal key, subconscious and potentially lucrative information about the responses advertisements elicit in viewers. Tools such as electroencephalography (EEG) and electromyography (EMG) can trace physiological responses that indicate levels of receptiveness to the stimuli being presented. This proposed research experiment seeks to present a sample of participants with either visual or auditory advertisements, tracked via EEG or EMG, to essentially determine which mode of advertising is more effective. It also seeks to determine if EEG and EMG indicate similar levels of response.

https://digitalcommons.lmu.edu/honors-research-and-exhibition/2017/section-02/2