Presenter Information

Annie HeckmanFollow

Start Date

10-12-2019 5:00 PM

Description

Bird window collisions cause a large number of bird deaths every year. Despite the high mortality rate, there are relatively few studies that have examined building characteristics as potential correlates for fatal avian window collisions. Most studies that have examined this topic have focused on the Eastern and Midwestern regions of the United States. As a result, there is a relatively small amount of information available surrounding the interaction between building characteristics and bird window collisions on the West Coast. This project aims to determine building characteristics that impact bird collision rates on the Loyola Marymount University Campus. The buildings will be characterized by window/façade direction (cardinal direction), degree of window exposure, façade area, and surrounding features (e.g. degree of vegetation, vegetation type(s), and vegetation height) to determine factors that influence collision rates. The findings of this study will be used to inform the University of potential mitigation strategies in order to preserve the health of the avian population at LMU as well as fill in the current gaps about avian window collisions in cities along the West Coast.

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Mentor: Kristen Covino

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Dec 10th, 5:00 PM

Assessing Factors that Influence Avian Window Collisions on the Loyola Marymount University Campus

Bird window collisions cause a large number of bird deaths every year. Despite the high mortality rate, there are relatively few studies that have examined building characteristics as potential correlates for fatal avian window collisions. Most studies that have examined this topic have focused on the Eastern and Midwestern regions of the United States. As a result, there is a relatively small amount of information available surrounding the interaction between building characteristics and bird window collisions on the West Coast. This project aims to determine building characteristics that impact bird collision rates on the Loyola Marymount University Campus. The buildings will be characterized by window/façade direction (cardinal direction), degree of window exposure, façade area, and surrounding features (e.g. degree of vegetation, vegetation type(s), and vegetation height) to determine factors that influence collision rates. The findings of this study will be used to inform the University of potential mitigation strategies in order to preserve the health of the avian population at LMU as well as fill in the current gaps about avian window collisions in cities along the West Coast.