Event Title

Feminism & Food

Presenter Information

Margaret QuiggFollow

Event Website

https://docs.google.com/presentation/d/1zG3DRN21mgILGIk9P_IbIjaUf5Q1XGLM6kMEwXjPUmk/edit#slide=id.p

Start Date

2-5-2022 11:05 AM

Description

Cooking shows have been used to help inform audiences about food, culture, and overall health, while simultaneously mirroring gender roles implemented in the kitchens of audiences’ homes. By analyzing the way female cooking show hosts present themselves on screen, via clothing, hairstyle, and jewelry, I can ascertain how growing understandings of what women look like have been implemented in these cooking shows throughout the years. I intend to study the cooking shows of three women: Julia Child, Ina Garten, and Ree Drummond, who all started their shows from different educational positions. Each were wives, but with varying degrees of education and understanding of family. Focusing on vernacular used to convey who received the food they have cooked or influenced their recipe can reveal their perception on a woman’s role in the kitchen, either professionally or in the home. Through my examination of physical appearance and vernacular in female hosts’ cooking shows, I hope to offer research that could prompt further questions for analyzing other cooking shows, such as those of males to use as a comparison.

Comments

Mentor: Mairead Sullivan

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    May 2nd, 11:05 AM

    Feminism & Food

    Cooking shows have been used to help inform audiences about food, culture, and overall health, while simultaneously mirroring gender roles implemented in the kitchens of audiences’ homes. By analyzing the way female cooking show hosts present themselves on screen, via clothing, hairstyle, and jewelry, I can ascertain how growing understandings of what women look like have been implemented in these cooking shows throughout the years. I intend to study the cooking shows of three women: Julia Child, Ina Garten, and Ree Drummond, who all started their shows from different educational positions. Each were wives, but with varying degrees of education and understanding of family. Focusing on vernacular used to convey who received the food they have cooked or influenced their recipe can reveal their perception on a woman’s role in the kitchen, either professionally or in the home. Through my examination of physical appearance and vernacular in female hosts’ cooking shows, I hope to offer research that could prompt further questions for analyzing other cooking shows, such as those of males to use as a comparison.

    https://digitalcommons.lmu.edu/honors-research-and-exhibition/2022spring/section-01/6