Event Title

Espacios de Confianza: Disrupting Power Imbalances within the Residency Experience

Event Type

Round Table Discussion

Start Date

23-7-2021 2:15 PM

End Date

July 2021

Description

Library residencies offer early career librarians an opportunity to develop their knowledge of and experiences within academic librarianship. Over the last few years, the number of residency programs have grown, especially as more institutions develop residencies to recruit and hire Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC). Residencies, however, are built on the concept of the “sponsored mobility system,” a term coined by Ralph H. Turner, whereby entrance to a system is contingent on sponsorship by an existing member. For residencies, this translates to their institutions acting as “sponsors'' for a resident to successfully achieve permanent employment in academia. This can exacerbate the power differential between the resident and the institution for which they work and can make it difficult for residents to speak truthfully about their experiences. Though some residents are hired in cohorts and/or have mentors within their respective institutions, many are solo residents navigating unique situations. To build community across geographical distances and bridge institutional gaps, the ACRL Residency Interest Group (RIG) has developed a mentorship discussion series to connect residents, foster peer mentorship, and build espacios de confianza. Espacios de Confianza or, Spaces of Trust, are informational networks that allow for participants to build transparency within societal and institutional structures. For BIPOC in primarily white institutions, espacios de confianza serve as a tool for survival. Though RIG mentorship discussions are open to all residents regardless of race, the majority of attendees are BIPOC. These mentorship discussions are intended to be safe virtual spaces to talk about shared challenges and sensitive topics in a confidential manner. Presenters will discuss how these spaces challenge the sponsored mobility system, allow residents to critically examine their experiences, build informal networks of information, and support each other as unique individuals with intersecting identities and needs.

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Jul 23rd, 2:15 PM Jul 23rd, 3:00 PM

Espacios de Confianza: Disrupting Power Imbalances within the Residency Experience

Library residencies offer early career librarians an opportunity to develop their knowledge of and experiences within academic librarianship. Over the last few years, the number of residency programs have grown, especially as more institutions develop residencies to recruit and hire Black, Indigenous, and people of color (BIPOC). Residencies, however, are built on the concept of the “sponsored mobility system,” a term coined by Ralph H. Turner, whereby entrance to a system is contingent on sponsorship by an existing member. For residencies, this translates to their institutions acting as “sponsors'' for a resident to successfully achieve permanent employment in academia. This can exacerbate the power differential between the resident and the institution for which they work and can make it difficult for residents to speak truthfully about their experiences. Though some residents are hired in cohorts and/or have mentors within their respective institutions, many are solo residents navigating unique situations. To build community across geographical distances and bridge institutional gaps, the ACRL Residency Interest Group (RIG) has developed a mentorship discussion series to connect residents, foster peer mentorship, and build espacios de confianza. Espacios de Confianza or, Spaces of Trust, are informational networks that allow for participants to build transparency within societal and institutional structures. For BIPOC in primarily white institutions, espacios de confianza serve as a tool for survival. Though RIG mentorship discussions are open to all residents regardless of race, the majority of attendees are BIPOC. These mentorship discussions are intended to be safe virtual spaces to talk about shared challenges and sensitive topics in a confidential manner. Presenters will discuss how these spaces challenge the sponsored mobility system, allow residents to critically examine their experiences, build informal networks of information, and support each other as unique individuals with intersecting identities and needs.