Event Title

Session 3: "Keep Shining, Keep Smiling...": LIS Collegiality through a Relational-Cultural Lens

Event Type

Presentation

Location

WHH 117

Track

Collegiality as Self Care

Start Date

13-7-2018 1:45 PM

End Date

13-7-2018 3:00 PM

Description

Applying the “Relational-Cultural Theory” model (which arose from work done by the Stone Center Theory Group at Wellesley College in 1977 by Miller, Jordan, Stiver, & Surrey), three female library faculty members of color at different professional stages of their careers (tenured, tenure-track, lecturer-transitional) explore how collegiality borne out of a mutual awareness and understanding of their intersectional identities fostered a supportive environment to engage in critical inquiry, grow as teachers, and also provide meaningful context to professional activities.

RCT pushes back against the dominant culture of “valorizing separation and autonomy” which underscores socio-cultural privilege. Rather, it is through relational empowerment--strengthening relationships through mutual empathy--that we start to mitigate the burden of emotional labor placed on women of color experiencing isolation and disconnection, and move towards authentic connections that have long-lasting professional (and personal) impacts.

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Jul 13th, 1:45 PM Jul 13th, 3:00 PM

Session 3: "Keep Shining, Keep Smiling...": LIS Collegiality through a Relational-Cultural Lens

WHH 117

Applying the “Relational-Cultural Theory” model (which arose from work done by the Stone Center Theory Group at Wellesley College in 1977 by Miller, Jordan, Stiver, & Surrey), three female library faculty members of color at different professional stages of their careers (tenured, tenure-track, lecturer-transitional) explore how collegiality borne out of a mutual awareness and understanding of their intersectional identities fostered a supportive environment to engage in critical inquiry, grow as teachers, and also provide meaningful context to professional activities.

RCT pushes back against the dominant culture of “valorizing separation and autonomy” which underscores socio-cultural privilege. Rather, it is through relational empowerment--strengthening relationships through mutual empathy--that we start to mitigate the burden of emotional labor placed on women of color experiencing isolation and disconnection, and move towards authentic connections that have long-lasting professional (and personal) impacts.